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Old 02/19/2020, 12:02 AM   #51
ThRoewer
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How far is the store from you in terms of traveling time?

Hands, if washed properly, should be a lesser issue.
Droplets transferred on clothes are also a possibility.
The biggest risks are shoes! That's why commercial aquaculture facilities and even some public aquaria have visitors and staff disinfect their shoes in food baths before entering sensitive areas.

These may give you an idea of how aquaculture facilities try to protect themselves from pathogens:
Biosecurity in Aquaculture
Biosecurity for Aquaculture Facilities


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Old 02/19/2020, 12:14 PM   #52
SMR45
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The store is about 5 miles away, so about 15-20 minutes.

I read the articles and would never have guessed shoes! Droplets on clothes I can see if you touch an area thatís still wet and than place your hands in the tank.


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Old 02/19/2020, 02:38 PM   #53
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20 minutes might be short enough for an Amyloodinium stage to remain viable and infective in a droplet.
A droplet can get onto you without even touching anything. All that's needed is a pump, an air stone, or anything else to create a splash or otherwise send a droplet airborne. And there is plenty of that in pretty much every fish store.
It has actually been published in research papers that tank to tank transmission of velvet is possible via airborne droplets. Though in those cases the tanks were in the same room.

A droplet transfer of velvet from a store to a home tank is still a long shot but so far it would be the most plausible explanation I could come up with given all the info you provided. Maybe try to find out if the store had issues with velvet when you were there before the outbreak. If they had an outbreak it would definitely support this theory.


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3 P. diacanthus. 2 C. starcki

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Old 02/19/2020, 10:17 PM   #54
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At this point, I agree a droplet of water containing velvet is possible. Iíve been to the store since and they didnít have an outbreak. They do get shipments of new fish weekly that could have coincided with my visit before the outbreak. Iím there monthly so itís hard to remember specifics of a particular visit that was routine at the time.

I do appreciate your diligence on this. I have learned so much about velvet and pathogens in general. Iíll never take anything for granted again.


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Old 02/19/2020, 11:16 PM   #55
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I would still not be too concerned about going to the store. If this was indeed a droplet transfer from an infected LFS tank to your clothes and from there to your tank then it was a freak coincident - pretty much the equivalent to hitting the Powerball jackpot.

BTW, Amyloodinium is an algae and as such, it can live for a good while (weeks to months) of photosynthesis alone. But this also provides a way of keeping it in check by unleashing predators like rotifers, feather dusters, or sponges on it. This may not be too useful in a fish tank, but it may help to eliminate free stages in coral and invert quarantine systems.


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Pairs: 4 percula, 3 P. kauderni, 3 D. excisus, 1 ea of P. diacanthus, S. splendidus, C. altivelis O. rosenblatti, D. janssi, S. yasha & a Gramma loreto trio
3 P. diacanthus. 2 C. starcki

Current Tank Info: 200 gal 4 tank system (40x28x24 + 40B + 40B sump tank + 20g refugium) + 30x18x18 mixed reef + 20g East Pacific biotop + 20g FW +...
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Old 02/25/2020, 09:53 PM   #56
SMR45
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Apologies for the delayed response. I agree this must have been a freak thing and I will continue to go to my LFS (would have rather hit the Powerball with the odds of it happening though).

I did not realize Amyloodinium was an algae, makes sense that it seems to like light.

I have read a few articles about rotifers, feather dusters and sponges since reading your post. It seems feather dusters should only be in a reef tank but I’m intrigued by the rotifers and sponges. Do you think they can flourish in a fish only tank? I have thought about keeping sponges before because of the angels I keep but never considered rotifers.


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Old 02/26/2020, 03:06 PM   #57
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When speaking of feather duster worms in this context I'm thinking more of the tiny hard or soft tube ones that come as hitchhikers. Especially the hard tube ones prefer to to grow in the shade, on the back of the tank, in overflows, filter Chambers, and skimmers. Sometimes they can be a bit of a nuisance, but overall they are benign and actually beneficial.

The same goes pretty much for most sponges.

Rotifers on the other hand will be hard to maintain in any kind of reef tank - there are just too many things that like to eat them.

All those will of course only be able to survive and thrive in a tank without copper.

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Pairs: 4 percula, 3 P. kauderni, 3 D. excisus, 1 ea of P. diacanthus, S. splendidus, C. altivelis O. rosenblatti, D. janssi, S. yasha & a Gramma loreto trio
3 P. diacanthus. 2 C. starcki

Current Tank Info: 200 gal 4 tank system (40x28x24 + 40B + 40B sump tank + 20g refugium) + 30x18x18 mixed reef + 20g East Pacific biotop + 20g FW +...
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Old 03/05/2020, 05:08 PM   #58
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ThRoewer some interesting reading there. Thank you!


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